Coming Soon: Interview With Edguy, Down, Kill Devil Hill, Necrophagist, Napalm Death, Circus Maximus and much more
Coming Soon: Reviews Of Killer Be Killed, Aborted, Sebastian Bach, Gamma Ray, Autopsy, Triptykon and much more
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Wednesday, April 23, 2014

REVIEW: Triptykon - 'Melana Chasmata'

Thomas Gabriel Fischer – a heavy metal deity par excellence – a man who has seen everything from an awry familial situation, a repressed childhood, to being mocked for his early musical musings to being heralded as a pioneer of his time, meeting success, joy, conflict and downfall in quick succession. The heavy metal world is indeed eternally indebted to Fischer in multiple ways, having been a precursory figure and incredibly seminal on not only black and death metal, but also other divergent styles such as doom metal, death/doom metal, thrash metal, symphonic metal, gothic metal and avant-garde metal. From the Venom/d-beat punk-inspired occultist primitivisms of Hellhammer, to the proto-extreme metal ävänt-gärdist tendencies of Celtic Frost, with the latter ultimately being subjected to (in retrospect) unintended stylistic shifts that led to its first downfall, while human conflicts led to its final demise. A life having been characterized by turbulence across his professional/artistic endeavours and personal relations, the Warrior had the perfect fuel to keep the fire burning in a most genuine and unfeigned manner.

Eparistera Daimones’ was a perfection of the latter day Celtic Frost formula, albeit it was driven by a heightened sense of rage and exasperation than the more brooding and pensive ‘Monotheist’ was, no doubt owing quite a lot of its inspiration to Tom Warrior’s very own experience in Celtic Frost – the destruction of his very own creation. Four years after the band’s last release, the prospect of Tom Warrior and his cohorts returning with another full-length album was nothing short of exciting, and needless to say the expectations for this release were beyond high. Risk-taking is something that has typified the very artistic ethos of Fischer across his long career, and although all his forays into various styles haven’t been successful, it is hard to argue against the fact that his experimentations alongside the basal style he has honed for himself since his return to metal has been nothing short of stellar. Onto the actual music itself, the primary tool employed by Fischer when creating his sound-scapes is the guitar tone, superseding the intricacy of the riff itself. This is not to say that it is lacking in the latter department, as the muscular, finesse-laden riffing and decrepit grooves of songs like ‘Tree of Suffocating Souls’ or ‘Breathing’ (parts of which will certainly make the Hellhammer/Celtic Frost fan in one smile) will attest to. Rather, the less is more formula serves its purpose when it has such a monolithic tone to lean back on, which is precisely why this textural quality make songs like ‘Black Snow’, ‘Altar of Deceit’ or ‘In  The Sleep of Death’ such suffocatingly emotive experiences, painting utterly morose images of doom and death as opposed to being mere droning chug-fests. Fischer and V. Santura’s guitar work invokes a certain gargantuan majesty that is primitive at heart but cultivated and seasoned in its execution, as if to analogically project Fischer’s journey from both a personal and creative perspective.

It cannot be stated emphatically enough that Fischer is no stranger to experimentation, and his sheer genius in this regard shines through on ‘Melana Chasmata’. To assign a genre tag to this album would certainly do it no justice, as the band experiments with a variety of tones, sounds, samples and textures that run the gamut of everything from extreme metal (doom/death/black) to more gothic atmospheres and even slightly dabbling in industrial, ambient and dare I say post-rock–like elements. It is the juxtaposition of these very elements across the length of the album making for a more rounded experience. In a sense, this serves as a metaphorical expression of the range of human emotions, and in turn adjusting the atmospheres to the fatalistic dispiritedness undertones of the record. ‘Demon Pact’ is perhaps the best reflection of the way Warrior flirts with the industrial side of things and conjures absolutely arcane atmospheres and rendering almost catacomb-like images. In terms of the rhythm section, Vanja Šlajh’s bass work, as brooding as the guitars are especially emphasized when the band considerably slows down its pacing; while Norman Lonhard’s drumming is legitimately dexterous and lucid in its execution, ushering in different paces that in turn establish the dismal moods at play.

What is admirable is that these experimentations are not simply indulged in for the sake of artistic snobbery or as a face-value wow factor, but it instead adds to the thematic explorations, juxtaposition and more specifically, the narrative in a most honest manner. For instance, take for instance the clean chord progression seen on the first few songs, which I believe all share a C♯-driven tuning and recurrent notes, reinforcing a common narrative conveyed through different compositions, in turn manifesting a larger theme. Invoking everything from misanthropy, depression and a dejected sense of yearning, Fischer’s vocals serve as the perfect vehicle for the expressions of these themes and moods, being both hoarse and sludgy in textural quality with the cadenced command and surly, booming quality of a formidable archon; while Santura with his occasional backing vocals, a more harsher voice only further adding to the excruciating ambiance. Warrior’s performance on the vocal side of things is also diverse, with the moan-like vocals one became acquainted with on ‘Into the Pandemonium’ appearing on ‘In the Sleep of Death’, while a more baritonal indulgence is seen on ‘Aurorae’, both calming and disconsolate in its scope. Simone Vollenweider once again makes a guest appearance, having been associated with Fischer since ‘Monotheist’, providing vocals on tracks like ‘Boleskin House’ and ‘Waiting’, which I would like to think mirrors the ethereal ‘My Pain’ from the debut, providing a fleetingly conciliating closure of sorts to this sombre, wrathful and epic journey through these deep, dark valleys of human thought - and what better visual compliment for a masterpiece of an album than a piece by surrealistic visionary and genius par excellence H.R Giger?


Creative profundities and musical intricacies aside, Triptykon’s sophomore is an album that not only stands proud within the context of metal music but as a piece of art in itself. It is a far more pensive and introspective experience than Eparistera Daimones’, an admittedly more outright heavy and furious record. Melana Chasmata is cathartic, it is theatrical and full of a poetic sense of existential agonizing and yet has exhuberant moments, and as a whole the integrity and sheer honesty of the artists at hand is more than evident in this type of music, which is both otherworldly and fantastical in its purview, utterly bleak in aesthetic and yet so incredibly intimate and personal. May this triptych reign into eternity.

Rating – 9.5/10
--
Reviewed by,
Achintya Venkatesh


NEWS: GEOFF TATE Is 'The Voice Of QUEENSRŸCHE'

SOURCE : BLABBERMOUTH

In what appears to be a preview of the upcoming settlement announcement over the rights to the Queensrÿche  name, singer Geoff Tate's Queensrÿche webpage has changed. It no longer says "Queensrÿche" at the top and now features a banner with the words "Geoff Tate: The Voice Of Queensrÿche." In addition, there is a link to "Queensrÿche Without Geoff Tate" which points to QueensrycheOfficial.com, the official webpage of the Todd La Torre-fronted version of the band.

Queensrÿche guitarist Michael Wilton recently confirmed that Tate — who was fired from the Seattle progressive rock band in 2012 after fronting it for three decades — and his former bandmates have reached a settlement in their legal battle over the rights to the group's name.

Speaking to the Allentown Music ExaminerWilton was asked when fans can expect a resolution of the legal case involving the two versions of Queensrÿche. "That's coming up," Wilton said. "What I can say is that both sides have reached an amicable settlement and it's now just a matter of time. There will be an official press release, but for now, you'll have to wait."

Wilton also revealed that the Todd La Torre-fronted version of Queensrÿche is continuing work on material for the follow-up to last year's self-titled effort. "We've already begun the process for the next album," he said. "We have probably six songs demoed so far. We're taking it in a direction suited to what we do as Queensrÿche but maybe a little more progressive and heavier. The thing is, you never know what you really have until it's complete. It's like carving a piece of clay and seeing how it turns out. You peel off the layers until you get to something really cool."

Tate and his wife, Susan, Queensrÿche's former manager, filed a lawsuit in June 2012 asking the judge to award them the rights to the band's name in exchange for Tate paying Eddie Jackson (bass), Michael Wilton (guitar) and Scott Rockenfield (drums) the fair market value for their interests in the Queensrÿche companies. WiltonRockenfield and Jackson filed a countersuit against the Tates in which they accused Geoff of creative obstruction and violent behavior, and Susan Tate of questionable business practices.

While ruling against Tate, the presiding judge determined that there was no legal hurdle in Tate also using the name with an all-new lineup of musicians. "I don't see any reason that Mr. Tate can't have the benefit, if he gets other members, of whatever name he uses of using the brand," Superior Court Judge Carol A. Schapira said during the July 13, 2012 court hearing. "I think [doing that would be] inherently confusing, although I'm sure the market can get these things sorted out," she added.

WiltonRockenfield and Jackson last year accused Geoff Tate of "continu[ing] to harm the Queensrÿche brand" since the Tates' original lawsuit was filed in June 2012. In a court document, they wrote: "The newest self-titled Queensrÿche CD release by the [Todd La Torre-fronted version of the band] entered the U.S. charts at #23 and continues to get 9-out-of-10-star reviews and is still selling very well on a weekly basis around the globe. In comparison, Geoff Tate released his own Queensrÿche CD in April of [2013] titled 'Frequency Unknown' and depicted as F.U. on the cover, which entered the charts at #82, received very bad reviews around the world, and has slowed to almost no more weekly sales. [The Todd La Torre-fronted version of Queensrÿche's] new CD even outperformed the last two CDs of them with Geoff Tate, selling more in a month than the 'Dedicated to Chaos' CD has since its release in 2010, and charting much better than both that album and the previous one, 'American Soldier'. Thus, the return to the classic sound [Tate's former] bandmates have made with the new CD and live shows has been met with overwhelming success."

They added: "Geoff Tate also chose very poorly in hiring live musicians that have shown that they are not capable of representing the correct performances of the Queensrÿche music legacy, and he was constantly replacing them. He has been offering his low-quality version of Queensrÿche to the promoters at a much reduced rate, as low as $10,000 per night, when, in fact, [his former] bandmates have done their best to keep the authorized Queensrÿche at an average of well over $20,000 per show this entire year. However, this becomes harder and harder with Geoff Tate's sub-par band and cut-rate pricing that continues to be damaging to the Queensrÿche brand and legacy no matter who ultimately wins control after trial."

In an interview with The Oakland Press, Rockenfield said said that "negotiations are ongoing between Tate and the singer's former bandmates and "there's still time for anything to happen between now and [the start of the trial]."

"I think our confidence is pretty high," Scott said. "There's a lot of legal stuff you have to deal with, but we just feel good and look at it as a light at the end of the tunnel and keep playing shows and making music. I think when you do that, the right decision will be made in time."


NEWS: SUICIDE SILENCE To Release 'You Can't Stop Me' Album In July

SOURCE : BLABBERMOUTH

California deathcore masters Suicide Silence will release "You Can't Stop Me", their first album to feature new vocalist Hernan "Eddie" Hermida (ex-All Shall Perish) and their first since the tragic loss of singer Mitch Lucker, on July 11 in Europe (except in the U.K., where it will arrive on July 14) and July 15 in North America via Nuclear Blast Entertainment.

"You Can't Stop Me" was produced and mixed by Steve Evetts, who worked with the band not only on "The Black Crown", but also on some instrumental demos for the new CD just prior to Lucker's death in the fall of 2012.

"The long and short of it is this," says guitarist Mark Heylmun. "Mitch left behind a set of lyrics with the title 'You Can't Stop Me'. This gave us chills, to say the least, and we knew we had the title and title track. This filled us with inspiration for writing sessions to empower us and empower you, the supporters of Suicide Silence.

"We as a band (and Steve Evetts) worked tirelessly on this record and I'm not gonna say we can't wait for you to hear it. I'm gonna tell you that you have to hear it. You have to sit and listen from start to finish.

"I'm not gonna tell you this is our best record we've ever done. I'm gonna tell you this is the record we care more about than any record we've ever done. This is a record that we fought, bled, sweated, and fucking cried over.

"Go pick up a copy and turn this sucker up to eleven.

"We couldn't be more excited.

"Thank you all for supporting Suicide Silence."

Mitch Lucker died November 1, 2012 after sustaining injuries in a motorcycle crash in Huntington Beach on Halloween night.

"We never talked about continuing and we never talked about quitting, so it was like an unspoken thing, 'cause with some people, a tragic happening, the last thing you want to do is talk about it," Suicide Silence guitarist Chris Garza told Music Feeds.

Ultimately, Garza explained, carrying on as Suicide Silence felt like the right thing to do. "I think keeping the Suicide Silence brand going and the name going keeps Mitch alive and I think it would be completely disrespectful to Mitch and everything that he worked for if we stopped going or changed the name," he added.

Regarding the direction of the new material, Heylmun told U.K.'s Metal Hammer magazine: "Eddie is quite a versatile vocalist and he's willing to experiment, so we're definitely exploring the horizons, but don't expect anything less than pure brutality throughout."

Randy Blythe, Robb Flynn and Max Cavalera were among the "surprise" guests who performed with with the surviving members of Suicide Silence at a special show on December 21, 2012 at the Fox theater in Pomona, California as a tribute Mitch Lucker. All proceeds from the event went towards the education of Mitch's six-year-old daughter, Kenadee Lucker.

The Pomona concert was professionally filmed for a DVD, "Suicide Silence - Ending Is The Beginning: The Mitch Lucker Memorial Show", that was released on February 18 in North America and was made available March 17 in Europe as a CD/DVD digipack and CD/Blu-ray combo pack.

Suicide Silence 2014 is:

Hernan "Eddie" Hermida - Vocals
Chris Garza - Guitar
Mark Heylmun - Guitar
Alex Lopez - Drums
Dan Kenny - Bass

NEWS: OZZY OSBOURNE Leads List Of Most Misunderstood Singers

SOURCE : BLABBERMOUTH

The Pulse Of Radio reports that Ozzy Osbourne topped a list of singers who have been voted the most difficult to understand, according to a new survey conducted by U.K. video-on-demand service Blinkbox. Along with Ozzy, other artists whose lyrics and vocals are hard to decipher include Lady Gaga, ABBAQueen, Bon Jovi and Jimi Hendrix.

According to the survey's findings, "many Brits believed the line in Gaga's 'Poker Face' was 'Polk her face,' while Ozzy's lyric 'Going off the rails on a crazy train' was misheard as 'Going off the rails on a gravy train.'"

Many members of the public could not understand Ozzy's speaking voice in the MTV reality series The Osbournes" — although Ozzy says now that he was heavily medicated during the making of that show.

The top 10 misheard song lyrics, according to Blinkbox, came from ABBA's "Dancing Queen", Queen's "We Will Rock You", Bon Jovi's "Living On A Prayer" and Jimi Hendrix's "Purple Haze", among others.

A phone app was created in 2011 to help people understand the infamous Brummie accent (a colloquial term for the inhabitants, accent and dialect of Birmingham, England), which Ozzy Osbourne is notorious for having.

The iBrummie app translates sayings from the famous second city twang into the Queen's English and says them out loud.

In a 2003 episode of "The Osbournes", the vocalist famously had problems with his then-new car, as the voice recognition system couldn't understand a word he said.uee

NEWS: NAPALM DEATH Issues New Album Update

SOURCE : BLABBERMOUTH

British grindcore pioneers Napalm Death recently entered the studio to begin recording the follow-up to 2012's "Utilitarian" for a late 2014 release. The band has posted the following update on its Facebook page: "First night done laying some more drum tracks down for the new Napalm Death album. A different approach than the last record with different recording sessions. Some of the songs are worked out, and some songs we are going for a more spontaneous approach to see where it takes us, but so far we are getting some cool dynamics in drum tones and songs, which will ultimately lead to a more diverse and crazy-sounding album. It's looking good so far."

Fan-fimed video footage of Napalm Death performing a brand new song, "Dear Slum Landlord", on April 10 at the Roadburn festival in Tilburg, The Netherlands can be seen below.

NEWS: URIAH HEEP: 'Outsider' Album Details Revealed

SOURCE : BLABBERMOUTH

Uriah Heep, one of the pivotal hard rock groups to emerge from England in the late 1960s, returns with "Outsider", its 24th studio album, and the first since 2011's "Into The Wild".

"Outsider" will be released on June 9 in the U.K., June 6 in the rest of Europe and June 10 in North America via Frontiers Records.

"We are very proud of our history," says Uriah Heep founder/guitarist Mick Box, "but it is equally important to keep producing new material. This new album, 'Outsider', is very much a rock album in true Heep style. It shows that we still have the same passion and energy for our music that we have always had."

From the opening chords of the album's hard-driving rocker "Speed Of Sound" to the more introspective closer "Say Goodbye", "Outsider" proves that Uriah Heep has remained a musical powerhouse, and one that can effectively balance its legendary sound with a distinctly contemporary approach. The record, which was produced by Mike Paxman, also introduces bassist Dave Rimmer, who joined the band last summer after the untimely death of long time member, Trevor Bolder.

Says Box of his late friend, Bolder: "We lost a world class bass player, singer, songwriter and friend. While Trevor was ill, he wanted us to continue working, so we used a bass player called Dave Rimmer, who Trevor approved of. It was only natural that Dave carried on with the band."

After major tours of Europe, Scandinavia, Russia and South America, upon the release of "Outsider", Uriah Heep will launch a world tour that will take in many continents as the band promotes the new album to an international audience.

"Outsider" CD track listing:

01. Speed Of Sound
02. One Minute
03. The Law
04. The Outsider
05. Rock The Foundation
06. Is Anybody Gonna Help Me?
07. Looking At You
08. Can't Take That Away
09. Jesse
10. Kiss The Rainbow
11. Say Goodbye

"Outsider" LP edition:

Side 1:

01. Speed Of Sound
02. One Minute
03. The Law
04. Can't Take That Away
05. Rock The Foundation

Side 2:

01. The Outsider
02. Is Anybody Gonna Help Me?
03. Looking At You
04. Jessie
05. Kiss The Rainbow
06. Say Goodbye

The "Outsider" cover artwork was created by Igor Morski and can be seen below.


Tuesday, April 22, 2014

REVIEW: Midhaven - "Spellbound"

Metal music in India was slow to start but it feels good as a metalhead to see more bands coming out with some good music. Although sometimes it's a hit and miss, either way it is good for the industry at this stage. And now we have big guns like Universal Music India releasing metal albums like this one from Midhaven. Midhaven is a progressive sludge metal band from Mumbai. Having released an E.P earlier called Tales from the Tide, this new album Spellbound contains a few tracks from the E.P in addition to new material. I decided to do a video review for some reason and all I'd like to say is, don't get your hopes up about this one.

Midhaven is:
Karan Seven Kaul - Guitars and Vocals
Shreyas Rane - Guitars
Abhishek Sawant - Bass and Vocals
Viraj Saxena - Drums (Sessions)


Watch The Video Review Below:





Click Here To BUY The Album


--
Reviewed By,
Bharat G

NEWS: NILE's KARL SANDERS: 'The Internet Has Changed The Entire Music Business'

SOURCE : BLABBERMOUTH

Karl Sanders of South Carolina-based extreme technical death metallers Nile was interviewed by David Garlow of Syracuse Music Examiner. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

Syracuse Music Examiner: I checked out an interview you did with Metalship webzine a year ago and you had some very insightful thoughts and opinions about the Internet and how it has affected bands, fans, and musicianship. Can you talk a bit about your thoughts on those topics?

Karl: Certainly. The Internet has changed the entire music business. For those of us that were around before the age of the Internet, it's a completely different world. None of the old rules apply anymore; it's change-and-adapt or die. A lot of people have to change their way of thinking or the way to make a dollar to make a living and keep going. There are no more CD sales. There are some, and it's getting harder to make a living on tour with the rising cost of touring. Everything goes up except the amount of money that we get paid.

Syracuse Music Examiner: Your album "At The Gate Of Sethu" is an insane work of art, man. Can you talk about the album and how is it different or the same as previous records?

Karl: It's a Nile record. It's brutal death metal and has exotic elements and deals with lyrics derived from ancient Egyptian histories, mythologies and so forth. That part's the same. The approach we had on that record is it's a very surgically clean record, a precise capture of the musicianship. I think that is really where the focus was; we wanted to capture as cleanly as possible what we were actually playing and present in that simple kind of light to people. Simple, honest — this is how we play. No fancy production.

Syracuse Music Examiner: You are headed into New York this week with shows in Albany and in Rochester. What can fans expect at the shows?

Karl: We're going to play some Nile songs and play our asses off! We are also bringing some songs that we have never played and songs we haven't played in a decade or so, so we are having a lot of fun with the setlist.

Syracuse Music Examiner: When will we get another album from you guys?

Karl: Actually we are writing songs for the next record. We took a break to do this tour. We have a new record in the works and we are excited for it, yeah! It's what we live for!

Read the entire interview with Syracuse Music Examiner.

NEWS: GEOFF TATE And Former Bandmates Reach 'Amicable' QUEENSRŸCHE Settlement

SOURCE : BLABBERMOUTH

Queensrÿche guitarist Michael Wilton has confirmed that singer Geoff Tate — who was fired from the Seattle progressive rock band in 2012 after fronting it for three decades — and his former bandmates have reached a settlement in their legal battle over the rights to the group's name.

Speaking to the Allentown Music ExaminerWilton was asked when fans can expect a resolution of the legal case involving the two versions of Queensrÿche. "That's coming up," Wilton said. "What I can say is that both sides have reached an amicable settlement and it's now just a matter of time. There will be an official press release, but for now, you'll have to wait."

Wilton also revealed that the Todd La Torre-fronted version of Queensrÿche is continuing work on material for the follow-up to last year's self-titled effort. "We've already begun the process for the next album," he said. "We have probably six songs demoed so far. We're taking it in a direction suited to what we do as Queensrÿche but maybe a little more progressive and heavier. The thing is, you never know what you really have until it's complete. It's like carving a piece of clay and seeing how it turns out. You peel off the layers until you get to something really cool."

Tate and his wife, SusanQueensrÿche's former manager, filed a lawsuit in June 2012 asking the judge to award them the rights to the band's name in exchange for Tate paying Eddie Jackson (bass), Michael Wilton (guitar) and Scott Rockenfield (drums) the fair market value for their interests in the Queensrÿchecompanies. WiltonRockenfield and Jackson filed a countersuit against the Tate in which they accused Geoff of creative obstruction and violent behavior, and Susan Tate of questionable business practices.

While ruling against Tate, the presiding judge determined that there was no legal hurdle in Tate also using the name with an all-new lineup of musicians. "I don't see any reason that Mr. Tate can't have the benefit, if he gets other members, of whatever name he uses of using the brand," Superior Court Judge Carol A. Schapira said during the July 13, 2012 court hearing. "I think [doing that would be] inherently confusing, although I'm sure the market can get these things sorted out," she added.

WiltonRockenfield and Jackson last year accused Geoff Tate of "continu[ing] to harm the Queensrÿche brand" since the Tates' original lawsuit was filed in June 2012. In a court document, they wrote: "The newest self-titled Queensrÿche CD release by the [Todd La Torre-fronted version of the band] entered the U.S. charts at #23 and continues to get 9-out-of-10-star reviews and is still selling very well on a weekly basis around the globe. In comparison, Geoff Tate released his own Queensrÿche CD in April of [2013] titled 'Frequency Unknown' and depicted as F.U. on the cover, which entered the charts at #82, received very bad reviews around the world, and has slowed to almost no more weekly sales. [The Todd La Torre-fronted version of Queensrÿche's] new CD even outperformed the last two CDs of them with Geoff Tate, selling more in a month than the 'Dedicated to Chaos' CD has since its release in 2010, and charting much better than both that album and the previous one, 'American Soldier'. Thus, the return to the classic sound [Tate's former] bandmates have made with the new CD and live shows has been met with overwhelming success."

They added: "Geoff Tate also chose very poorly in hiring live musicians that have shown that they are not capable of representing the correct performances of the Queensrÿche music legacy, and he was constantly replacing them. He has been offering his low-quality version of Queensrÿche to the promoters at a much reduced rate, as low as $10,000 per night, when, in fact, [his former] bandmates have done their best to keep the authorized Queensrÿche at an average of well over $20,000 per show this entire year. However, this becomes harder and harder with Geoff Tate's sub-par band and cut-rate pricing that continues to be damaging to the Queensrÿche brand and legacy no matter who ultimately wins control after trial."

In an interview with The Oakland Press, Rockenfield said said that "negotiations are ongoing between Tate and the singer's former bandmates and "there's still time for anything to happen between now and [the start of the trial]."

"I think our confidence is pretty high," Scott said. "There's a lot of legal stuff you have to deal with, but we just feel good and look at it as a light at the end of the tunnel and keep playing shows and making music. I think when you do that, the right decision will be made in time."

Monday, April 21, 2014

INTERVIEW: ALEX RUDINGER On Conquering Dystopia Album : "I Had To Step Up My Drumming Because Of Jeff & Keith's Riffs"

Alex Rudinger began playing drums at the age of 13 and it took him very little time to realize how much he loved the instrument. Early on he got into rock and metal drumming and to this day very little has changed. Although much of his time is invested in performing/recording with groups (The Faceless, Conquering Dystopia) of this genre, he is not limited to playing only these styles. He takes great pride in his work. Precision and creativeness are very important to him and the way he applies himself to the instrument clearly reflects this.It's evident in debut album of Conquering Dystopia featuring Jeff Loomis, Alex Webster, Keith Merrow & Alex himself. Alex Rudinger is evidently and consistently faster on the album. He has gotten the opportunity to unleash his mad skills behind the kit non-stop and has utilized that opportunity fully.

Metal Wani's Editor In Chief Owais 'Vitek' Nabi recently had a chat with Alex Rudinger as he discusses his drum sound, influences, challenges he faced on Conquering Dystopia album, The Faceless upcoming album,  different styles of music and much more.

Listen to the Interview Below:



NEWS: DEMONIC RESURRECTION to Play at Wacken Open Air 2014

Indian death metal stalwarts Demonic Resurrection have been announced to play at this year's edition of Wacken Open Air in Germany. The metallers from Mumbai released this press statement :-

"DEMONIC RESURRECTION (INDIA) ANNOUNCED FOR WACKEN OPEN AIR 2014

Indian metal veterans Demonic Resurrection have just been announced to play at Wacken Open Air 2014. W:O:A is one of the worlds biggest metal festivals with almost 80,000 attendees in the small village of Wacken in Schleswig-Holstein, northern Germany.


"It's very hard to put into words exactly how it feels. For us it's still just a small step forward but when you've been busting your ass for 14 years it definitely feels like a big deal, given that it is the coveted 'Wacken Open Air' the festival most metal heads dream about playing or attending. It's definitely going to be a religious experience and we're going to deliver a kick-ass performance." said frontman Demonstealer

Demonic Resurrection is set to release a new album sometime this year on Candlelight Records worldwide and on Universal Music in India."

Covered By: Sairaj R. Kamath

Sunday, April 20, 2014

INTERVIEW: HATEBREED's Frank Novinec About Relationship With The Fans: "We're All One. We're All Together"

The mid-nineties saw a major upheaval of the many sub-genres of rock and metal alike. And one of the few bands to have come out of that revolution and still going gung ho are Hatebreed. Out of Connecticut, this heady hardcore punk band turned crossover has seen through the past two decades with 6 studio records, various lineup changes and their fair share of controversies. Yet, with their flag on full mast on the back of their successful "The Divinity of Purpose", they assure us their time may have come but it won't be gone that soon.

Guitarist Frank Novinec took some time off to catch up with Metal Wani's correspondent Nicoline Brochdorff Therkildsen & Vaishali Jain right before they stormed up Denmark's Voxhall. In their Hate-fueled tour bus, he discussed Hatebreed's 20th anniversary, fans response to “The Divinity Of Purpose” and its sucessor's current status, some other hopes and plans for the future, and much more.

You can listen to the whole interview here: -

NEWS: BRUCE DICKINSON, GLENN HUGHES, IAN PAICE Pay Tribute To Late DEEP PURPLE Keyboardist JON LORD

SOURCE : BLABBERMOUTH

Glenn Hughes, Ian Paice, Don Airey, Rick Wakeman and Micky Moody are among the musicians who celebrated late Deep Purple keyboardist Jon Lord's life and music at a special concert on April 4 at London, England's Royal Albert Hall.

Hughes was joined on stage by Dickinson for both "You Keep On Moving" and a storming "Burn" with a mesmerizing keyboard solo from Wakeman, followed by Hughes alone backed by an orchestra for a roof-raising vocal delivery on "This Time Around".

Fan-filmed video footage of the performance can be seen below.

Jon Lord died on July 16, 2012 at age 71 after a long battle with pancreatic cancer. Lord, who was known for his keyboard virtuosity and his reinvention of the Hammond B-3 organ sound, co-wrote such PURPLE classics as "Smoke On The Water" and "Child In Time", among others. Lord and drummer Ian Paice were the only original members to last through the band's initial run from 1968 to 1976. He was on board for their 1984 reunion and stayed on through to his 2002 retirement from the band, after which he's worked primarily in the classical field.

Over the course of his career, Lord also worked with the Artwoods, Flower Pot Men, Paice, Ashton And Lord, Whitesnake and good friend and neighbor, George Harrison.

In an interview with Peter Makowski, Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich stated about Jon Lord: "I'm not sure that the people in today's hard rock world really truly understand how innovative this guy was. He wasn't just another keyboard player on the side of the stage. In '66/'67, when Hendrix, Townshend and Ritchie Blackmore were taking the electric guitar to a new level, by using banks of Marshall stacks beefing up the sound, Jon Lord was one of the first guys in hard rock to take the keyboards through the same process. He took a fairly standard instrument like a Hammond organ put it through amplifiers and Leslie cabinets and introduced a whole new way of forcing the sound out of the keyboards.

"Ritchie Blackmore said the other day that Jon formed Deep Purple; he was certainly the instigator that made things happen. If not the musical leader, Jon was the spiritual leader of the band. He was a pioneer, and I think that somehow that's gotten a little lost in the last few [months]. People are talking about, obviously, what a gentleman he was and what a fantastic band member but he really did something nobody had done before with the sound of the keyboards and I think that's probably the biggest thing to remember him for."


NEWS: TESLA To Release 'Simplicity' Album In June

SOURCE : BLABBERMOUTH

Frontiers Records will release Tesla's brand new studio album, "Simplicity", on June 6 in Europe.

The Sacramento rockers are back with 14 new songs offering a ride of energy that doesn't come easy for a band of rookies much less a band whose been doing this for over 20 years. "Simplicity" is Tesla's seventh all-original studio album which follows a six-year creative break from the release of the previous album, "Forever More".

After a string of shows in the USA in 2013, the band went back into the studio in early 2014 and came out with a new album, which goes straight back to the Tesla roots. The bandmembers produced it themselves, as they did with "Into The Now", their successful comeback effort from 2004. Helped by the legendary Tom Zutaut, who was the man behind the best Tesla albums, this new CD rocks from start to finish, showing a variety of emotions where each song has its own twist — not sounding like another.

The first new song off the new album, "Taste My Pain", was released last summer digitally via iTunes and Amazon. The track was recorded during a two-day (June 5-6, 2013) session at J Street Recorders in Sacramento. The new song is, according to the band, "A heavier song with a hard-driving beat and Tesla trademark blazing guitars."

Guitarist Frank Hannon says about "Simplicity": "I must say that this new Tesla album is really gonna be awesome. We went in more prepared with the songs and ideas way more than 'Forever More', and the style is pure Tesla back to our roots. I truly believe you guys are gonna love it!"

"The opening track is called 'MP3'," continues Hannon, "and starts off with an opus intro that orchestrates into a heavy slow groove with lyrics about technology and how we miss simplicity, vinyl albums, family values...and has a heavy-ass riff! Then we segue into a rock and roll song called 'Ricochet' that talks about Uncle Ted... [I] can't wait to play this stuff live!

"Simplicity" (European version) track listing:

01. MP3
02. Ricochet
03. Rise And Fall
04. So Divine...
05. Cross My Heart
06. Honestly
07. Flip Side!
08. Other Than Me
09. Break Of Dawn
10. Burnout To Fade
11. Life Is A River
12. Sympathy
13. Time Bomb
14. 'Til That Day
15. Burnout To Fade (writing demo version) *

"Simplicity" was mixed by legendary producer Michael Wagener.

* Bonus track

Tesla is:

Jeff Keith: Lead Vocals
Frank Hannon: Guitars, Vocals, Piano, Bass
Brian Wheat: Bass, Vocals, Piano
Troy Luccketta: Drums and Percussion
Dave Rude: Guitars, Vocals, Bass







Saturday, April 19, 2014

INTERVIEW: CIRCUS MAXIMUS's Michael Eriksen On Upcoming Album : "Prepare Yourselves For Long Epic Progressive Metal Pieces"

Three stellar and consistent albums back-to-back at the beginning of one's career is not a feat easily achievable by a band playing progressive metal, a genre fiercely sniped at by critics. With their third effort "Nine", the band has effectively erected a monument to its dominance on the top of the proverbial prog mountain. Circus Maximus is one of those rare bands that can write a 70 minute record that is entertaining for every minute while wandering between all sorts of different styles. The record feels fluid, flowing seamlessly from one awesome variation to the next; sometimes heavy, sometimes somber, sometimes funky, but always excellent. Stunning technicality, fluid and enjoyable melodic development, tone variation, and gargantuan heavy parts have practically ensured Circus Maximus’s reign for the foreseeable future in the hotly-contested genre. Having set the expectations even higher after their previous album "Nine", Circus Maximus are currently working on their 4th studio album slated to release later/early next year.

Metal Wani's Editor In Chief Owais 'Vitek' Nabi and writer Shivam Kalra recently had a chat with CIRCUS MAXIMUS Frontman Michael Eriksen as he discusses Circus Maximus journey from the beginning, upcoming New Album, Progressive metal scene, best progressive metal albums of 2013 and much more.

Listen to the Interview Below:



NEWS: BILL WARD On OZZY OSBOURNE: 'I've Lost A Friend, As Far As I'm Concerned'

SOURCE : BLABBERMOUTH

Legendary Black Sabbath drummer Bill Ward was recently interviewed by Metal Chris of DCHeavyMetal.com. You can now listen to the chat using the SoundCloud widget below.

DCHeavyMetal.com: In November, you did an interview with Rock Cellar Magazine and in that interview you said that you hadn't listened to any of the new Black Sabbath album, "13", except for maybe about 40 seconds of [the promotional track] "God Is Dead?" Have you listened to that album since then?

Ward: No and I probably won't.

DCHeavyMetal.com: You don't think you ever will?

Ward: I, I… Maybe if I reach a point of serenity where I'm able to give it a listen but no there's nothing of value in there for me to listen to. I love the guys. I really hope that they receive blessings and wonderful things in their life. [I'm] communicating with Terry ["Geezer" ButlerBlack Sabbath bass player], I'm communicating with Tony, privately. We always send our very, very best wishes to each other and our love to each other. But no, I'm not interested in the album. It was something that I wanted to play on. I was completely able to play on it. There's no question in my heart at all. So, you know, it's still something that I don't care, I don't care to listen to it. Even if it was the most brilliant album in the world, I don't care to listen to it.

DCHeavyMetal.com: That leads me to the question, do you ever see yourself as a part of Black Sabbath again?

Ward: Well, a lot of things have happened to me. Starting in September, 2013, I had a horrible illness, which I'm still recovering from, and it created some other things that I am still recovering from. That's one of the reasons why I didn't come to [my previously scheduled appearance in] Annapolis [for an art exhibition], you know. So aside from me now having to do a lot of work to gain my health and my strength back, you know, and I'd be the first to admit it if I can't cut it physically as a drummer, then my answer would be no. I would not be prepared to play with Sabbath, you know. I would never, ever, ever allude to being able to play with Sabbath if my health wasn't absolutely smack on. And my health right now is not bad, but it's not good enough to certainly play in any band, never mind Black Sabbath. I have to get a lot stronger than where I am. I lost a lot of weight. I've got to gain all my muscle back. I lost all my muscle. And I'm doing some stick practice, but if I was in a good position where I felt strong enough, I can overcome the hits that I took, the verbal hits, I can overcome all that stuff. I can overcome, you know, just the shutdown and the way that I felt and everything else. I can overcome all of those things. All of the things that were like at the time just like, "What the hell?" I can certainly recover from all that stuff, actually. I can do it pretty good. You know, in fact, I've recovered from most of it as I'm speaking to you this morning. I'll always have an open mind to playing with Black Sabbath. I love the band. I miss them terribly. And so my answer would be leaning towards if something could be worked out. Something that I could live with and I'm talking politically now, contractually. And not the kind of things that I've done in the past. I'm talking about the very core of what I talked about in my big statement of February 2012. If we can come to some terms, and we're all OK with each other, and the most important thing for me is being able to know that I can play drums the way that I want to be. Otherwise I wouldn't even enter into any kind of conversation with them if I knew that I wasn't back on the mark. Then I would be moving forward. I think that a lot of fans have suffered horribly through these undertakings of the last couple of years, and I fully, fully blame the inconsiderateness of just a few people who created, and I won't talk about who, but a few people who created such a huge wasteland of real, real pain when everyone was just so excited to see the original band with an original record. And I'd already stated my boundaries quite early in all this. It didn't come overnight. It wasn't a shock. You know, it wasn't something that suddenly happened. We'd been negotiating for over 15 months. Things like that, so… But I have to be careful in overstating, because there's still a political agenda attached to this. So I've definitely got an open mind. I miss playing with Terry, Geezer, just horribly. I absolutely miss him to death. And I miss playing with Tony just… every day. I mean every single day I — it just blows me away, man. And obviously I miss Oz [Ozzy OsbourneBlack Sabbath vocalist]. I've had to… With Ozzy, I… I've lost a friend, as far as I'm concerned. A man that I dearly loved, and I still dearly love, but I've had to really now readjust just how much I'm going to trust and love him. He fired back on some pretty mean stuff in the press, so... And I've gone OK. Like with any of us, when we get hurt, we're going to pull back our love and our considerations for another human being when they kick out at you and you know. So that's been a big loss.

DCHeavyMetal.com: In the last couple years in the world of metal there have been several high-profile drummers that have either been kicked out of their bands or just kind of you know similar situations to you I think where there's contract issues and things where I think the drummers feel like they're not getting at least a respectable compensation for what they're doing. I'm talking about like big bands here like Dave Lombardo of Slayer, Mike Portnoy leaving Dream Theater, and I'm sure there's others as well. But do you think drummers right now, in the world of modern metal, do you think they're just being undervalued?

Ward: Yeah, there's something going on. Just for the record, I know Mike and Dave Lombardo is a very good friend of mine. Me and Dave have had many Indian food — much Indian food —and we've discussed these things in the last two years, that's for sure. Yeah, I think what's going on is we find the key players and the other players have less value and it's become some kind of new modern thing, modern thinking. It's like the other guys don't count as much or they can be replaced. Let's just focus on who we think are the stars in the band and you'll see it all the time. It's been going on for a long, long time. A lot of other bands have adopted this similar idea. It's been around for a while. I think it comes out of a managerial idea, for the most part. Not a very good managerial idea at all. But it's just something that's going on, and I've had private discussions with a lot of people about this, and I think it's not only necessarily aimed at drummers, I think it's aimed at other people as well. And it's not just because the guys are being [night] owls or whatever you know. It's nothing to do with that. Back in the day, that was, like, it's about him, it's about him and let's blame him and that and that and that, you know. And it's not about me. I absolutely refuse to take any responsibility of blame that's been thrown at me. I will be accountable to the fans and I will be responsible to the fans, because they are extremely important to me. I think what we're seeing is something that's been going on for a while that's starting to take seed and we're now seeing the results of defocusing other people and we're seeing that more focus goes on the primary players and that's been going on since, well, I'll probably get into trouble with this, since all of the teams. Mick Jagger and Keith Richards and all the way through. And I'm not saying for one second that The Rolling Stones' setup is like that, OK?! I'm not saying that. It's a very interesting subject and as more is being revealed, I can probably be a little more revealing, but it's so bloody political that I have to watch what I'm saying. Because otherwise, I know that there are some people that would probably love to sue my ass, and I would think they would get a great deal of pleasure from that.

DCHeavyMetal.com: Well I'm not trying to get you in any trouble here either so…

Ward: No, no, I know. I know. No, I'm enjoying the interview, but I just have to be careful, you know. And a lot of the times I wear a lot of my stuff on my sleeve. I'm so bloody transparent and I hate having to play hopscotch, but I feel like I've been as honest as I can be with you right now.

You can read the entire interview at DCHeavyMetal.com.